Services

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Crawlspace or  Basement

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The Oregon certified home inspector shall observe and describe visible structural components including:

(a) Foundation;
(b) Floors and floor structure;
(c) Walls and wall structure;
(d) Columns or piers;
(e) Ceilings and ceiling structure; and
(f) Roofs and roof structure.

(2) The Oregon certified home inspector shall:(a) Probe or sound structural components where deterioration is suspected, except where probing would damage any finished surface;

(b) Enter underfloor crawl spaces, basements, and attic spaces except when access is obstructed or restricted, when entry could damage any property, or when dangerous or adverse situations are suspected;

(c) Report the methods used to observed underfloor crawl spaces and attics; report inaccessible areas; and

(d) Report signs of abnormal or harmful water penetration into the building or signs of abnormal or harmful condensation on building components.

Exterior

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1) The Oregon certified home inspector shall observe and describe:

(a) Wall cladding, flashings, and trim;
(b) Entryway doors and all windows;
(c) Garage door operators;
(d) Attached decks, balconies, stoops, steps, areaways, porches, and applicable railings;
(e) Eaves, soffits, and fascias; and
(f) Vegetation, grading, drainage, driveways, patios, walkways, and retaining walls with respect to their effect on the condition of the building that adversely affect the structure.

(2) The Oregon certified home inspector shall:

(a) Operate all entryway doors and a representative number of windows;

(b) Operate garage doors manually or by using permanently installed controls for any garage door opener; and

(c) Report whether or not any garage door opener will automatically reverse or stop when meeting reasonable resistance during closing, or reverse with appropriately installed optical sensor system.

Structure

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(1) The Oregon certified home inspector shall observe and describe visible structural components including:

(a) Foundation;
(b) Floors and floor structure;
(c) Walls and wall structure;
(d) Columns or piers;
(e) Ceilings and ceiling structure; and
(f) Roofs and roof structure.
(2) The Oregon certified home inspector shall:
(a) Probe or sound structural components where deterioration is suspected, except where probing would damage any finished surface;

Electrical

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(1) The Oregon certified home inspector shall observe:
(a) Service entrance conductors;
(b) Service equipment, grounding equipment, main overcurrent device, and distribution panels;
(c) Amperage and voltage ratings of the service;
(d) Branch circuit conductors, their overcurrent devices, and the compatibility of their amperages and voltages;
(e) The operation of a representative number of installed ceiling fans, lighting fixtures, switches, and receptacles located inside the house, garage, and on the dwelling’s exterior walls;

(f) The polarity and grounding of all receptacles within six feet of interior plumbing fixtures, and all receptacles in the garage or carport, and on the exterior of inspected structures;

(g) The operation of ground fault or arc fault circuit interrupters;

(h) Smoke alarms; and
(i) Carbon monoxide detectors.
(2) The Oregon certified home inspector shall describe:
(a) Service amperage and voltage;
(b) Service entry conductor materials; and
(c) Service type as being overhead or underground;
(3) The Oregon certified home inspector shall report:
(a) Any observed 110 volt aluminum branch circuit wiring; and (b) The presence or absence of smoke alarms, and operate their test function, if accessible, except when detectors are part of a central security system.

Plumbing

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(1) The Oregon certified home inspector shall observe:

(a) Interior water supply and distribution system, including piping materials, supports, and insulation, fixtures and faucets, functional flow, leaks, and cross connections;

(b) Interior drain, waste, and vent system, including traps, drain, waste, and vent piping, piping supports and pipe insulation, leaks, and functional drainage;

(c) Hot water systems including water heating equipment, normal operating controls, automatic safety controls, and chimneys, flues, and vents;

(d) Above ground oil storage and distribution systems including interior oil storage equipment, supply piping, venting, and supports; leaks; and

(e) Sump pumps and sewage ejection pumps.

(2) The Oregon certified home inspector shall describe:
(a) Water supply and distribution piping materials;
(b) Drain, waste, and vent piping materials; and
(c) Water heating equipment.

(3) The Oregon certified home inspector shall operate all plumbing fixtures, including their faucets and all exterior faucets attached to the house except where the flow end of the faucet is connected to an appliance or interior faucets not serviced by a drain.

Interior

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(1) The Oregon certified home inspector shall observe and describe:

(a) Walls, ceiling, and floors;
(b) Steps, stairways, balconies, and railings;
(c) Counters and cabinets; and
(d) Doors and windows.

(2) The Oregon certified home inspector shall:

(a) Operate a representative number of windows and interior doors; and
(b) Report signs of abnormal or harmful water penetration or damage in the building or components or signs of abnormal or harmful condensation on building components.

1) The Oregon certified home inspector shall observe and describe:

(a) Insulation and vapor retarders/barriers in unfinished spaces;

(b) Ventilation of attics and foundation areas;
(c) Kitchen, bathroom, and laundry venting systems; and
(d) The operation of any readily accessible attic ventilation fan, and when the temperature permits, the operation of any readily accessible thermostatic control.

(e) Absence of insulation in unfinished space adjacent to heated living areas.

Mechanical

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(1) The Oregon certified home inspector shall observe permanently installed heating systems including:

(a) Heating equipment;
(b) Normal operating controls;
(c) Automatic safety controls;
(d) Chimneys, flues, and vents, where readily visible;
(e) Solid fuel heating devices;
(f) Heat distribution systems including fans, pumps, ducts, and piping, with supports, insulation, air filters, registers, radiators, fan coil units, convectors; and

(g) The presence of installed heat source in each room.

(2) The Oregon certified home inspector shall describe:
(a) Energy source; and
(b) Heating equipment and distribution type.
(3) The Oregon certified home inspector shall operate the systems using normal operating controls.
(4) The Oregon certified home inspector shall open readily accessible panels provided by the manufacturer or installer for routine homeowner maintenance.

HVAC

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(1) The Oregon certified home inspector shall observe:

(a) Central air conditioning systems including cooling and air handling equipment and normal operating controls.

(b) Distribution systems including fans, pumps, ducts and piping, with associated supports, dampers, insulation, air filters, registers, and fan-coil units.

(2) The Oregon certified home inspector shall describe:
(a) Energy sources; and
(b) Cooling equipment type.
(3) The Oregon certified home inspector shall operate the systems using normal operating controls.
(4) The Oregon certified home inspector shall open readily openable panels provided by the manufacturer or installer for routine homeowner maintenance.

Roofing

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(1) The Oregon certified home inspector shall observe and describe:

(a) Roof coverings;
(b) Roof drainage systems;
(c) Flashings;
(d) Skylights, chimneys, and roof penetrations; and
(e) Signs of leaks or abnormal condensation on building components.

(2) The Oregon certified home inspector shall report the method used to observe the roofing and components.

Radon Testing

imgRadon is a radioactive gas that emanates from rocks and soils and tends to concentrate in enclosed spaces, such as underground mines or houses. Soil gas infiltration is recognized as the most important source of residential radon. Other sources, including building materials and water extracted from wells, are less important in most circumstances. Radon is a major contributor to the ionizing radiation dose received by the general population.